Goodbye to our old lady.

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Sadly we had to say goodbye to our old lady rat, Nibbles, on Saturday. Nibs and Ruby, her companion, came to us in March 2014. They’d been owned by a family for a year and were from a pet shop originally, so we don’t know how old she was but we make it at least 3 years! She was very protective of Ruby when we got them and was also very nippy and territorial over their cage; but she calmed down and became the matriarch of the cage and an absolute cuddlemonster 🙂

She’s been slowing down gradually, but the past couple of weeks her lungs had gotten very bad, she’d been very badly hit by respiratory infections twice before (the only two times she’s had meds before recently!) and bounced back very quickly, but this time her age was against her and we made the decision with the vet to let her go rather than leave her suffer another week or two at most.

RIP Nibbles, my beautiful silverfawn. I don’t regret getting you one single bit x

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4 thoughts on “Goodbye to our old lady.

    1. Thank you 🙂 Admittedly both my husband and I are okay about Nibbles’ death, we were expecting it, she was very old and had done so well to get to that age and we knew that we’d massively improved her life so whilst we were/are sad, it was much less upsetting (so to speak) than the other two deaths we’ve had so far, both of which were sudden and very horrible in their nature.

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      1. Unfortunately they are 😦 Sorry that you’ve had the same, it’s horrible isn’t it? Had we not had Nibs put to sleep it would have been respi issues that took her, probably within days really.

        Our big boy has had respi problems from day one, along with his brother who died in November, we’re amazed that he’s still around tbh, he was two at Christmas and is constantly on and off of baytril and veraflox along with other things to clear mucus and clear his lungs.

        His brother died after getting a retrobulbar tumour, it came up very quickly so we decided to have his eye removed and he died towards the end of the operation.

        We also had a female with cystic tumours, they’d been operated on and came back immediately. They had burst a couple of times but she’d been fine afterwards so we cleaned her up as you do, but on her last occasion it was obvious that she was very weak from it and so we took her to the vet at that point for the last time.

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